Project 3: Content Strategy

Content strategy focuses on the planning, creation, delivery and governance of content. Ensuring that you have useful and usable content, that is well structured, and easily found is vital to improving the user experience.

The goal of content strategy is to create meaningful, cohesive, engaging, and sustainable content.

the Content Strategy Quad helps describe the content-oriented and people-oriented components

CONTENT STRATEGY QUAD

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Core strategy – defines how your content will help you meet business objectives.

Substance – identifies what content is required to successfully execute implement your core strategy, including characteristics such as messaging architecture, intended audience(s), and voice and tone.

Structure – focuses on how content is prioritised, organised, and accessed. Although structure can include information architecture (IA), it focuses more deeply on the content itself, including mapping messages to content, content bridging, and creating detailed page tables.

Workflow – explains how people manage and maintain content on a daily basis, including the roles, tasks, and tools required throughout the content lifecycle.

Governance – describes the policies, standards, and guidelines that apply to content and its lifecycle, as well as how an organisation will sustain and evolve its content strategy.

ELEMENTS OF CONTENT STRATEGY – A CHECKLIST

https://alistapart.com/article/a-checklist-for-content-work

Good content is appropriate:

Publish content that is right for the user and for the business

It should be appropriate for your business, for your users, and for its context.

Content is appropriate for users when it helps them accomplish their goals. The user’s context includes actions, constraints, emotions, cognitive conditions, and this in turn affects the ways in which the user interacts with content.

But assumptions about reader context—however well researched—will never be perfect. Always give readers the option of seeing more information if they wish to do so.

LERAN MORE OPTION

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Right for the business:

Content is appropriate for a business when it helps to accomplish the business goals in a sustainable way.

Business goals include things like “increase sales,” “improve technical support service,” and “reduce printing costs for educational materials.”

Sustainable content is content you can create—and maintain—without going costing too much, without lowering quality in ways that make the content no longer effective.

Fundamentally, “right for the business” and “right for the user” are the same thing. Without readers, viewers, and listeners, all content is meaningless. This principle boils down to an enlightened self interest: that which hurts your users hurts you.

Good content is useful:

Define a clear, specific purpose for each piece of content; evaluate content against this purpose.

To know whether or not you have the right content for a page, you have to know what that content is supposed to accomplish. Greater specificity produces better results.

INTO PAGE: GET PEOPLE TO BROWSE OR OPEN NEW ACCOUNT

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PROFILE PAGE: PEOPLE CAN SEE THE DIFFERENT FUNCTIONS HERE ON THE APP –
all consistently marked blue to indicate they are interactive

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Good content is user-centered:

Adopt the cognitive frameworks of your users

On a UX project, user-centered design means that the final product must meet real user needs and fulfill real human desires.

In The Psychology of Everyday Things, cognitive scientist Donald Norman advocates that user-centered design systems should “make sure that (1) the user can figure out what to do, and (2) the user can tell what is going on.”

When it comes to content, “user-centered” means that instead of insistently using the client’s internal mental models and vocabulary, content must adopt the cognitive frameworks of the user. That includes everything from your users’ model of the world to the ways in which they use specific terms and phrases.

EAMPLE OF THIS IN THE APP WOULD BE THE NOTEBOOK AND SKETCHBOOK DESCRIPTIVE FUNCTIONS THAT PEOPLE WOULD BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE CONCEPTS

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Publishing content that is self-absorbed in substance or style alienates readers.

Good content is consistent:

Mandate consistency, within reason

For most people, language is our primary interface with each other and with the external world. Consistency of language and presentation acts as a consistent interface, reducing the users’ cognitive load and making it easier for readers to understand what they read. Inconsistency, on the other hand, adds cognitive effort, hinders understanding, and distracts readers.

The use of style guides such as the Chicago Manual of Style is an example of this in practice.

EAMPLE OF THIS IN THE APP WOULD BE THE USE OF CAPITALS ON THE NAVIGATION ICONS OR THE UNIFORMLY CONSISTENT FONT USAGE FOR THE MAIN PAGE HEADINGS

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Good content is supported:

Publish no content without a support plan

Factual content must be updated when new information appears and omitted once it’s no longer useful; user-generated content must be nurtured and regulated if required; time-sensitive content like breaking news or event information must be planted on schedule and cut back once its outdated.

One of the reasons content is not properly maintained is that most content plans rely on getting the already overworked to produce, revise, and publish content without neglecting other responsibilities. Unless content and publishing tasks are recognised as time-consuming and complex and included in job descriptions and resource planning, it will continue to miss the mark.

IBM Graph

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